Monday, March 6, 2006

THE RISE OF A PHOENIX: DRUSILLA DUNJEE-HOUSTON

In this seventh edition of The Black Fist: Best & Brightest Everyday Black History Series, We will pay honor to a Supreme Queen, a black woman of great literary intellect -- our beloved sister Drusilla Dunjee-Houston. Sister Drusilla was born at a time when women, especially the 'black woman' where not seen and NEVER heard. This powerful sister broke down the barriers and not only did she exposed the wickedness of the whiteman here in america, but exposed the fact that "we" came from something bigger than chattel slavery, we, the black people of the earth had a great African past that she documented in her published work, The Wonderful Ethopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire.

So Sit back and read about an extraordinary black woman who is worthy to be honored in our best & brightest black history series. General Nikki X likes to call this one....The Rise Of A Phoenix.

DRUSILLA DUNJEE-HOUSTON (1876-1941)

Drusilla Dunjee-Houston was born June 20, 1876 in Harper's Ferry, West Virginia. Her father was John William Dunjee, a minister with the Baptist Home Missionary Society. Houston was the eldest of five children and lived in many locations in the South and later in Oklahoha, where her father moved to establish Baptist churches for blacks in rural areas.

By early 19th century standards, the family was middle to upper class enjoying many opportunies and benefits of "first family" in the 10 different churches founded by John Williams.

As Drusilla described their status "My father very early on owned a libruary of 3,000 choice volumes. On the wall of our home hung fine oil paintings and other things in the home surprising to one who a few years before had escaped from slavery to Canada.

A few years after arriving in Oklahoma, Drusilla eloped and married Price Houston in 1898, a wealthy businessman who was 20 years her senior. The couple settled in McAlester Seminary for girls. Twelve years later she returned to Oklahoma City where she continued teaching. In 1915 she became a contributing editor with the Black Dispatch, a local black newspaper began by her brother Roscoe Dunjee.

A school teacher, newspaper columnist, community activist, church leader, and historian, Drusilla Dunjee-Houston ranked history as the highest level of intellectual pursuits. It became her primary means of individuation providing a measure of security and assurance about her own heritage - a mixture of African-America, Native American, and White.
Her interest in ancient African and historical research was triggered by the 1915 publication of The Negro authored by W.E.B. DuBois. Her life-long pursuit of Africa's past and her devotion to her race places Dunsilla Dunjee-Houston in the foremost ranks of Pan-Africanist historians.

Houston moved to Sapulpa, Oklahoma and started a private school for women and girls called the Oklahoma Training School for Women and Girls. The name was later changed to the Oklahoma Baptist College. While in Sapulpa, she included another column for her readers entitled Training School Notes to keep them updated on the activities at Sapulpa and sustained the financial support links that she had established for the school. Drusilla remained in Sapulpa for five years before returning to Oklahoma City in 1923.

Many societal and family demands filled Houston's life. She managed to raise her only child by herself after Price's death, write weekly for the Black Dispatch to which she contributed nealy 2,000 editorials, and taught public school on a full time basis. In addition to these accomplishments, Drusilla managed to amass an impressive amount of documentation of the ancient African past - culminating in her only published work, The Wonderful Ethopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire.

Houston's last place of residence was Phoenix, Arizona where she went to live close to her sister Blanche and her children. Even though she retired to Phoenix due to illness, she began immediately to write columns for the Arizona Journal and Guide.

Drusilla Dunjee-Houston died from tuberculosis on February 2, 1941. Her daughter Florence was at her bedside.


Well there you have it folks! The life of another extraordinary black woman ahead of her time, Sister Drusilla Dunjee-Houston. Sadly, at the time of her death in 1941, she was working on another book of African history. Who knows how that book would've turned out and what truths Drusilla Dunjee-Houston would've uncovered in her journeys. The Wonderful Ethopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire is a piece of literary work, General Nikki X has read 5 times and on her way to a 6th.
It is to be studied and re-studied. General Nikki X has always believed that the way to educate oneself is to "re-educate" oneself.

Drusilla Dunjee-Houston is a class study in dignity, fortitude and mastering the science of delving deeper into not whats on the surface but what's right beneath the surface. She gave us one of the greatest documents ever written about our dignified & glorious past. And today we, The Black Fist Organization give Drusilla Dunjee-Houston a big "Black Power Salute" and our deepest gratitude for showing us -- "Black WAS Beautiful" -- before -- there ever was a black power shout of..... "Black IS beautiful!"

STAY TUNED TO OUR EIGHTH INSTALLMENT COMIN' BLACK ATCHA SOON. RIGHT HERE ON THE "ONLY OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE BLACK FIST,"...THE BLACK FIST BLOG!

BLACK FIST, BLACK POWER, BLACK NATION!!!


7 comments:

Anonymous said...

I learn something new everyday reading your site sister. Keep up the great work you dobut I wish you would call Lincoln Ware more often you are the one the people like to hear from and you always put Lincoln in his place!
May I make a suggestion? Could you do more black history series and more often it probably takes time but it is very interesting for us out here who are 'conscience' and get tired of the racism for whites and the playa-hating rhetoric from blacks?

Your Sister,
Sister Dina

Anonymous said...

Would you please do a count down on how long it takes the white media to cover Stephanie Dumas's campaign for county commissioner. She's got more experience in government than Pepper. It's outragous that they've completely balcked her out.

Anonymous said...

I am the biographre of Drusilla Dunjee Houston. I always happy when someone writes about Houston. However, you lifted materials directly from my writings--webpage--and dissertation without citing where you got this information from. That is theft and laziness on your part. Certainly you could say where you got information from, that is the African thing to do. And, you do not have the courage to print this comment, do you?

General Nikki X said...

Black Power & Greetings anonymous,

Let's get right down to it shall we:
1. I am not a theft nor am I lazy.
2. Yes, I have the "courage" to post your comment. See there it is.
3. I re-printed this piece from "anonymous".
4. I now have done the "African Thing".

And Thank You For Reading The Black Fist Blog!

P.S. "Is it the "African Thing" to call your sisters and brothers lazy thefts and not even publish your real name?

Peggy said...

I do not know why my name did not come through. I am Peggy Brooks-Bertram, Dr.PH., PhD. and I am the biographer of Drusilla Dunjee Houston. Much of that material was lifted from my site with no mention of where you got it. That is not the thing to do as we try to inform our people of our history. Further, you might be interested in my publication of Houston's lost manuscript, Wonderful Ethiopians, Boook II, Origin of Civilization from the Cushites. You can get that book at Peggy Bertram Publishing, pbertram@gmail.com. Look forward to hearing from you.

Peggy said...

When I complained about your "theft" of my material I did send my my name which is Peggy Brooks Bertram but you did not print that. thanks

General Nikki X said...

To Ms. Brooks-Bertram,

I've just gotten back online and pleased that you've discovered The Black Fist Blog. As administrator of said blog I'd like to inform you that I posted this piece on Ms. Houston from Wikipedia not your book.

I do not appreciate being called a "theft" and I've posted several entries in my "Black History Series" from Wikipedia.

I posted your comment along with your name.
I hope that makes you feel better.

All that I've written has been written, not in anger only in sistaly concern and clarification.

Thank You For Reading The Black Fist Blog!